Friday, December 30, 2016

Some information from the San Francisco Daily Alta California Newspaper dated September 24 1884 about the Oakland Glass Works.

16 comments:

  1. I know this may seem stupid, but what the heck is a "claret bottle?" Does it refer to a typical wine bottle of any color, ie: the western blown wines? Is it red glass? I have never gotten a clear explanation on this. Thanks! DM

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  2. Great question Dale, not really sure ?

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  3. My initial thought is that "claret" refers to the contents...which would be wine. The actual color "claret" would be red.Never seen a red bottle except for the 80s-90s red whittled whiskeys and bitters, but they are German.Claret cannot be clear, as they call this "white" glass....AAAAUUURRRGGGGHHHH....

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  4. Here's the long and short of it.

    OGW's article, published on 9/24/1884, was their first and last with regards to pimping their wares. As was customary in that era, one first attempted to sell the sizzle, and then the steak.

    Simply, OGW was unable to deliver on their promise of blue sky with regards to "Claret Bottles".

    "Claret bottles" was simply a reference to the European method of turn mold production, which erased the presence of mold seams. This production method was both expensive and counterproductive compared to the methods employed by west coast manufacturers in the 80's and early 90's.

    The failure of OGW, and San Francisco and Pacific Glass Works to duplicate this method helped lead to the successful importation of like products produced by both Gerreshiemer Glasshuetenwerk and Gesellschaft fur Glassindutrie of Dresden Germany en masse during the latter parts of the 19th Century.

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  5. Claret bottles are a specific style of wine bottle used. OGW did indeed manufacture this style of bottle.

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  6. The Claret bottles differ from the chardonnay or Pinot Noir style bottles in the shoulder area. The Claret has a distinctive shoulder while the chardonnay type has curved sides. I only know this because of the wine tasting event we have at the Downieville Bottle Show. The things you learn at a bottle show..
    rs

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  7. Can someone post a picture of a claret bottle -either from OGW or from another glassworks?

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  8. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  9. In the interest of accuracy;

    Was using MS Word when I wrote the original comment , in order to spell and grammar check. An error slipped through when I cut and pasted. A key part of once sentence was left out. This in turn indicated that neither OGW or SFPGW produced wine bottles. Nothing could be further from the truth.

    The correct sentence should have read;

    The failure of OGW, and San Francisco and Pacific Glass Works to duplicate this method

    in terms of both quality and quantity

    helped lead to the successful importation of like products produced by both Gerreshiemer Glasshuetenwerk and Gesellschaft fur Glassindutrie of Dresden Germany en masse during the latter parts of the 19th Century."

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  10. So I am thinking those western blown wines in the pretty colors are OGW?
    ...the dates are right on, mid 80s.

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    1. We've dug the Western wines in 70s pits too.

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  11. Those pretty colored wines with the seams would not be from OGW. The claret style bottles from OGW would not exhibit a mold seam.

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  12. Did I miss something in regards to OGW claret wines NOT having mold seams? Every other OGW bottle has seams...please clarify the claret :)

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    1. Dale,
      In my book, on the Oakland Glass Works chapter,I included 13 articles about OGW. The sixth article describes the method of manufacturing the claret wine bottles.

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    2. Dale,
      In my book, on the Oakland Glass Works chapter,I included 13 articles about OGW. The sixth article describes the method of manufacturing the claret wine bottles.

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    3. What Warren is referring to is the claret bottles were given a twist in the mold to remove the seam.

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