Monday, November 16, 2015

Have Some Cider

Here is a nice Eastern Cider, but unfortunately it has several 'checks' in the glass. Any theories why it is so hard to get a mint colored Eastern Cider ?









10 comments:

  1. My lame theory is that the "green" coloration is a total mistake for this typically amber cider. Western cider's are almost always amber and any off shade is a result of impatience by the glass blower or supposed time savings by allowing aqua or green glass to remain in the pots at the beginning of the amber "blow". This mixture of less than pure ingredients and a blending of such create the flawed olive examples. I think that any glass blown in the west in pure green or with ingredients for green glass is prone to annealing flaws. It is a wonderful surprise to find any western blown bottle in green without issues.You just do not see the high percentage of other colored glass with the checks and flashes.

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  2. I've been studying bottles of early California manufacture for some time now, and it is my opinion that the time the process of blowing the bottle and the temperature change that occurs by the time it is being annealed causes these stresses in the glass and the results are these internal fractures that do not go completely through the internal or external surfaces of the glass. They are a product of the process of producing glass without precise temperature controls.

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  3. Two learned explanations
    Thanks

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  5. (grammar error corrected and re-posted...)

    Warren;
    The temperature / time differential, to me, also makes sense. Case in point would be a particular drop dead "bird Cutter" that I currently have. The glass is extremely crude, and the bottle is extremely heavy by comparison. The is a huge "gob" of glass on the right mold seam, at the juncture of the neck / shoulder step. The external surface of the bottle is symmetrical, and the gob of glass increases the thickness of the glass x2 but only on the interior of the bottle. There is a roughly 4 mm star annealing check that is only partial thickness, and is only on the surface of the gob of glass on the inside of the bottle.

    This lends credence to your theory.

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  6. The temperature issue makes perfect sense as stones, and blobs of glass definitely cool at a different rate, thus making the piece prone to flashes. The "green" shades however, are typically "flashy" with no such stones or gobs of glass. Green glass blown in the west just seems to have different properties which flash out for no other reason other than being "green".

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  7. Kermit the Frog said it best..."It's not easy being green"

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  8. I know there are some epic Easter Cider color runs out there. Any photos?

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  9. Joe S. had a KILLER mint pure olive green example at Reno...try as I might, I could not get him down to a price I could live with.
    The Bob West sale in Pacific Glass Auctions had a super run from amber to yellow to olive green. Probably the best photo of a run of them.

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